Overview
Biography
Publications
Conferences and Workshops
Links
Ask the Grade Doctor
Contact Me
Links
  

 
Ask The Grade Doctor

Full Question Detail

Return to All Questions

Question

Dear Ken,

I recently attended a 'mixer' at the local college that was designed to provide area high-school teachers some insight into their program as it relates to our subject area.

It didn't take long for our partners in education to get around to the most important message of the day; namely, the college applies late-mark penalties and zeros. Furthermore, students are not free to write tests when ever they want to. All of these 'behaviourial' issues have lulled Ontario high-school students where such dealings with late and missed assessments was, until recently, a sad reality into a false sense of security. The college folk also added that the practice of separating behaviour from academic performance has produced a student with poor work habits and as a direct result one who does not do particularly well at this post-secondary level.

So what does the college want? They want students who can turn things in on time and take challenges more so than math ability. In light of this, my question is: when will you undertake controlled scientific efforts to ascertain the value of your assessment suggestions? I suspect--no, I know--that your null hypothesis would not hold up to scrutiny. Just ask students, parents, teachers, administrators, employers and other stakeholders both here and abroad.

Sincerely,

Roger Curtis

2011-04-16
Roger Curtis
 

The
Grade
Doctor
says:

The perceptions of college personnel and their assessment malpractice are not good
reasons to change practices in high schools. I simply do not believe that “practice of
separating behaviour from academic performance has produced a student with poor work
habits and as a direct result one who does not do particularly well at this post-secondary
level.” The college level has complained about the poor preparation of high school students
for decades so this is just a new version to try to cover their poor instructional and
assessment practices.
I am not a researcher so I will not “undertake controlled scientific efforts to ascertain the
value of (my) assessment suggestions.” I stand by my grading guidelines that are
supported by the experiences of thousands of teachers and the views of many assessment
experts.

 

 

Top