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Doc,
I'm a talented musician and have been playing piano since I was five.
I've received high A's in every music class I've ever taken, numerous
awards for my performances, and was inducted into the Tri-M music
honor society two years ago. I'm now onto writing my own songs, and it
has become an enjoyable pastime of mine. With that said, I love music
and take great pride in my efforts and results in any aspect of the
art. I'm now attending the University of Tampa as an Entrepreneurship
major and last fall I took an Electronic music and recording class for
an Art requirement. I knew this class would come easy to me given the
fact that I had already taken so many music classes in the past. In
fact, in high school, I took Electronic Music and Electronic Music
Honors and received a department recognition award for my work. Anyway
, last fall I handed in A work consistently. My classmates were always
impressed at the songs I was creating and since it's fun to me I even
made an extra composition! The end of the semester came and I received
my final grade. A "C". I was confused at first so I emailed my
professor only to find out that I lost nearly 30 points because I did
not attend 4 classes. Yes I skipped a few. I had Business speech right
after my music class and used it to study a few times. Now, if I had
known it would have cost me 30 points I would have never done so! I'm
pissed, disappointed and concerned that I screwed myself over here. My
professor won't budge on this despite the fact that everything I
handed in received A's including both tests. What do you think about
this?

2014-01-15
Nick
 

The
Grade
Doctor
says:

I think it is absurd that attendance is included in grades, and what is even worse apparently
the professor did not inform you about this ahead of time. You said the professor won't
budge, then I suggest you use his failure to communicate his grading plan as grounds for an
appeal to the Department chair or Dean.

 

 

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