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While we want very much to have give parents access to student progress, we are a school district that has been very slow in going in rigidly requiring teachers to post grades/student progress online primarily because we have seen too many poor grading practices re-emerge because most online grade books have an inherent rigidity to them: the ability to "average" and "weight" inaccurately, the difficulty posed in allowing students to re-do work, etc. Further, time restrictions some school districts put on teachers (e.g., "you must have 10 grades every three weeks")--we believe is not realistic for some subject areas and promotes mindless grading for no learning reason. It does not support learning and forces useless work on the part of the teacher. I could go on. Have you come across some sensible, reasonable guidelines for posting online grades that promotes good grading practices and honors the nuanced nature of teacher grading? We do not wnat to take the teacher's voice out of the grading picture and yet, we firmly believe parents need frequent access to their child's progress. I hope this makes sense. Thank you for whatever you can offer.

2013-03-02
S. Mitchell
 

The
Grade
Doctor
says:

You raise some important points. I have not seen specific "guidelines for posting online
grades that promotes good grading practices and honors the nuanced nature of teacher
grading," but I think the answer is that you have a clear, succinct school assessment policy.
This policy includes all the the things you mentioned and is shared with and explained to
parents and is posted prominently on your website.
With regard to "the ability to "average" and "weight" inaccurately," PowerTeacher displays -
mean, median, weighted median, mode, highest and most recent as well as number of
times assessed for each standard. I think this shows very clearly that there is not one right
way to calculate.

 

 

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