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Question

If a teacher identifies the assessments that he needs to show that a student understands the
material, in other words the summative assessments, and then uses the various codes, choosing
from around a dozen, to indicate non completion; should the principal be allowed to excuse these
assessments and force the teacher to guess at a mark based on the assessments completed? I am
assuming that the principal knows neither the course material or the student and that the student
has been given adequate opportunity to comply.

2012-09-17
bailey Green
 

The
Grade
Doctor
says:

Bailey, if you were looking for a yes or know answer you are not going to get it.

First, the only symbol teachers should use in their gradebooks for noncompletion is
something simple like NS (not submitted) or MW (Missing Work). Twelve codes is way too
complicated.

Second, the assessment plan that teachers develop for each course - and share with
students in week one - should identify the summative assessments, then the diagnostic
assessments that will guide instruction, and then the formative assessments that will
provide feedback to students and teachers so both can make adjustments to improve
learning. For the summative assessments the plan should clearly indicate how many and
which assessments are critical. If all the summative assessments are discrete students
would need to do them all, while if they all overlap only one would be necessary. In reality
what is needed is somewhere between the two, probably closer to the top end. So the
assessment plan might say "In this course there will be 9 summative assessments; for you
to receive a final grade you must do at least 6 including the third, fifth, and ninth. If you do
not do at least six including the 3rd, 5th and 9th, no matter how well you do on those you
submit, your grade will be an I for Insufficient Evidence which has the same impact as an F
and results in no credit for the course." The teacher is not 'guessing at a mark based on the
assessments completed' - what is required is planned and clearly communicated ahead of
time.

3. Once policies/procedures have been established part of a principal's responsibilities is
to monitor and to attempt to ensure that teachers are implementing those
policies/procedures.

I hope that my position on this is clear and that it answers your question.

 

 

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