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Hello Ken,

The four middle level buildings in our district (grades 6-9) recently collaborated on grading fix #2, don't reduce marks on "work" submitted late; provide support for the learner. The following four questions is a sample of some of the curiosity generated by the over 200 participants in attendance. Thank you for taking the time to answer our questions.

1. What should we do about students who are satisfied with a lower grade even when they have potential for higher scores?

2. How do we prevent students from falling behind with new concepts because they are still working on "late" work?

3. Can Ken O'Connor direct us to a research article that clearly shows parents prefer grade information in which academics and non-academics are separated?

4. How do I address the issue of homework tonight that is due tomorrow in order for tomorrow's lesson to make sense (example: pre-lab activities for a lab tomorrow)?

2011-11-08
John Unrein- Instructional Coach- Liberty School District
 

The
Grade
Doctor
says:

Thanks for your questions John and my apologies for the delay in replying.
1. What should we do about students who are satisfied with a lower grade even when they
have potential for higher scores?

Mentor and counsel them, maybe to the extent that the easiest thing to make you stop is
to make a greater effort and get better scores. This is the approach that Rick DuFour took
at Adlai Stephenson HS.

2. How do we prevent students from falling behind with new concepts because they are
still working on "late" work?

By providing timely support in a timetabled support period, or before or after school or at
lunchtime.

3. Can Ken O'Connor direct us to a research article that clearly shows parents prefer grade
information in which academics and non-academics are separated?

I am not a researcher and have no connection with a college or university so I cannot
answer this question. I suggest you direct it to Tom Guskey or Douglas Reeves. I am aware
of a number of school districts that have done parent surveys the results of which show
great satisfaction with the separation of achievement and behavior. Ultimately though this
is not about parent preference, it is about our professional and ethical responsibility to
evaluate and communicate accurate information about student achievement.

4. How do I address the issue of homework tonight that is due tomorrow in order for
tomorrow's lesson to make sense (example: pre-lab activities for a lab tomorrow)?

Pre-lab, i.e., learning activities, are diagnostic assessments that provide information for
teachers so that they can effectively plan instruction. It is essential that students feel safe
attempting these through knowing that the results are to help their learning and will not be
used against them in the determination of grades.

 

 

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